Completionist
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Making Progress

9 Comments and 27 Shares
I started off with countless problems. But now I know, thanks to COUNT(), that I have "#REF! ERROR: Circular dependency detected" problems.
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mihai
46 days ago
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For Ann
Cupertino, CA
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6 public comments
daanzu_alt_text_bot
28 days ago
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I started off with countless problems. But now I know, thanks to COUNT(), that I have "#REF! ERROR: Circular dependency detected" problems.
growler
47 days ago
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Всё так
bogorad
47 days ago
GTD rulez :)
JayM
48 days ago
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Heh
Atlanta, GA
zippy72
48 days ago
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I've got 99 problems or 103 depending whether my DCOUNT() or COUNTIF() is correct
FourSquare, qv
Covarr
49 days ago
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I started the day with coffee. But now, after hours and hours of work, it's worn off.
Moses Lake, WA
NielsRak
48 days ago
*minutes
expatpaul
49 days ago
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A far too familiar feeling
Belgium

Bloomberg: Apple Working on ARM Chip for Macs to Run Power Nap Features

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Interesting scoop from Mark Gurman and Ian King:

Apple engineers are planning to offload the Mac’s low-power mode, a feature marketed as “Power Nap,” to the next-generation ARM-based chip. This function allows Mac laptops to retrieve e-mails, install software updates, and synchronize calendar appointments with the display shut and not in use. The feature currently uses little battery life while run on the Intel chip, but the move to ARM would conserve even more power, according to one of the people.

The current ARM-based chip for Macs is independent from the computer’s other components, focusing on the Touch Bar’s functionality itself. The new version in development would go further by connecting to other parts of a Mac’s system, including storage and wireless components, in order to take on the additional responsibilities. […]

However, Apple has no near-term plans to completely abandon Intel chips for use in its laptops and desktops, the people said.

It’s interesting to ponder how this might work from a software perspective. With the current Touch Bar, there’s a conceptual wall between the Intel side and the ARM side. The “Mac” stuff all runs on the Intel side, and there’s an iOS computer on the ARM side that only does Touch Bar-related things.

I don’t think this use-the-ARM-chip-during-Power-Nap idea would involve emulating x86 code on ARM — you’d lose the energy efficiency advantage of ARM, which is the whole point. My guess is that Mac apps (and OS services) that want to take advantage of it would do so via small extensions, compiled both for ARM (for these future MacBooks) and x86 (for all other Macs).

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mihai
312 days ago
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PalmOS ARM-lets are making a comeback!
Cupertino, CA
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Adventures in the land of substrings and RegExps.

1 Comment and 2 Shares
read it here
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mihai
371 days ago
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"If you have never encountered this sequence before I suggest to stop and think for a bit how a formula for its sum is derived. Solution’s simplicity and elegance might provide a welcomed retreat from fighting Webpack configs. The Prince of Mathematics Carl Friedrich Gauss managed to figure it out when he was 8 - though obviously we would never know what he would do facing modern JavaScript ecosystem."
Cupertino, CA
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1213486160 has a friend: 1195725856

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Back in February, I wrote about finding a ridiculous number being passed to malloc. That number was 1213486160, and it turned out to be "HTTP" on the wire.

If you search the web for that, besides finding my original post, you'll find lots of people who have had stuff break and can't quite figure out why.

I'm making this mini-post tonight to do a public service. There's another number you'll probably see a fair bit if you work in the same space that has 1213486160 show up in it. That number is 1195725856.

>>> hex(1195725856)
'0x47455420'

See those 4x and 5x hex values with a 20 on the end? That should get you to raise an eyebrow. What does it say? Well, it's the flip side of the whole "HTTP" situation.

>>> chr(0x47), chr(0x45), chr(0x54), chr(0x20)
('G', 'E', 'T', ' ')

Yep, "GET ", as in "GET / HTTP/1.0" or similar.

In other words, if you see 1195725856 showing up in your logs, you're probably getting connections from things speaking HTTP at you: actual web browsers, security scanners, people running curl and wget, elite hax0rs trying to own you, and so on.

This one goes out to my friends at work who found another oddity in a production system and unraveled the significance. Welcome to the funny number spotting club!

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mihai
429 days ago
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Cupertino, CA
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Seth Bling turns Super Mario World into Flappy Bird

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first-of-its-kind code injection, by hand, on an unmodded SNES console  
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mihai
622 days ago
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And I thought the code injection in The Martian was impressive.
Cupertino, CA
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gazuga
603 days ago
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This pulled me down a massive Youtube shame spiral of classic game glitch videos. The ones that 'write' arbitrary machine code into memory by placing sprites at pixel-specific points on the screen, among other feats of insane patience, are true art.
Edmonton

Tire Swing

3 Comments and 6 Shares
If we find one of those tire dumps, the next time he tries to get his truck back we can just retreat and let him have it.
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mihai
623 days ago
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Meanwhile http://www.gocomics.com/calvinandhobbes/2016/03/18
Cupertino, CA
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2 public comments
Cthulhux
628 days ago
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A similar thing happened around my new pair of boxers.
Fledermausland
alt_text_bot
628 days ago
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If we find one of those tire dumps, the next time he tries to get his truck back we can just retreat and let him have it.
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